Green Book scored big on Monday, taking home the Academy Award for Best Picture amid a competitive field of films that all could have taken home the top prize themselves.

And many viewers thought they should have, including BlacKkKlansman director Spike Lee, who reportedly tried to storm out of the Dolby Theatre after the Best Picture winner was announced.

Jordan Peele, the Oscar-winning writer-director behind last year’s Get Out, was among other attendees who reportedly didn’t applaud the win.

“I’m snakebit. Every time someone’s driving somebody, I lose,” Lee later told reporters backstage, in reference to his breakout film Do the Right Thing, which lost the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay to 1990’s Driving Miss Daisy. “I thought I was courtside at the [Madison Square] Garden and the ref’s made a bad call.”

Around the World in 80 Days (1956)

This Jules Verne-inspired film beat out both Cecil B. DeMille’s The Ten Commandments and Walter Lang’s film adaptation of the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The King and I.

The ceremony marked DeMille’s final directing effort, which many believed should have taken home the top prize for its special effects and acting performances.

Around the World in 80 Days (1956)

Chariots of Fire (1981)

Seen as an underdog success, Hugh Hudson’s film was viewed by many as the lightweight choice when it took home the Best Picture prize in a field of competitive films.

Most cinephiles agree that Warren Beatty’s Reds, a drama about an American journalist who journeys to Russia and returns a radical, was much more deserving.

Chariots of Fire (1981)

Crash (2006)

Many film fans regard Crash as the least deserving Best Picture winner in Academy history due in part to its comparison to fellow nominee Brokeback Mountain as well as its stereotypical treatment of people of colour.

Even the film’s director Paul Haggis agreed that it didn’t deserve a win among a competitive field that also included Capote, Good Night, and Good Luck, and Munich.

Driving Miss Daisy (1990)

Several directors, including Spike Lee, spoke out against the movie for having little impact on the film world while more recent viewers have also criticised its subtly racist undertones.

It didn’t help that it also beat out a number of beloved films including Peter Weir’s Dead Poets Society.

Driving Miss Daisy (1990)

Kramer vs. Kramer (1979)

Kramer vs. Kramer shocked viewers when the intimate divorce drama took home the Best Picture prize over Francis Ford Coppola’s epic Apocalypse Now, especially after that film had earned the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival.

Clearly, the Academy connected with Robert Benton’s film, awarding it five Oscars, including for Best Supporting Actress for Meryl Streep and best Actor for Dustin Hoffman.

Kramer vs. Kramer (1979)